Andrew Yang is NYC's stand-out visionary political and economic figure.

Andrew Yang has always been a stand-out political and

economic figure in themix and mire of the AmerAmerican body-politic.

With a razor-sharp intellect and charisma to match, he truly came to light in the last

Presidential race when, for example, he easily raised more campaign funds than

some of his more experienced Democrat rivals.


Yang also championed the idea of Universal Basic Income (UBI), which entailed a

monthly payment of $1,000.00 to every adult American citizen and unconditional

green card holder. Seen as an outlandish, unsustainable idea at first, the

various COVID rounds of economic stimulus since then have shown UBI to be in

the vanguard of new socio-economic thinking for a post-pandemic country and

global economy.


New York City took a pandemic pounding in 2020 and, harrowingly, 2021 is

proving to be no better. Yang, now an ex New York City mayoral candidate, is

committed to helping the city recover from COVID, in all its forms, as quickly

and effectively as possible. Consequently, Yang has promoted a New York City

specific UBI that would provide some low-income city residents with thousands

of dollars of UBI relief every year.


On the back of that, word has it that Yang is on the verge of jumping off the

Democrat ship with the launching of his own third party within the next month.

No doubt UBI will be at the heart of that new political set-up.


It is the understatement of the century to say that

the current American two-party political party system is not just fit for

purpose, but rancid and rotten to the core with corporate interests riddling it

like worms in an apple. And on that note, who better to bring up than another

New York City mayoral candidate, Eric Adams.


Adams is presently a Democrat who previously identified as a Republican, until

such time as it no longer suited his Machiavellian political purposes. This shallow

flip-flopping by Adams is not only a perfect snap-shot of a failed American

political two-party system, it is also, somehow, surpassed by Adams’ long-held

love affair with stop and frisk for the streets of New York City.


In an age when police brutality and highly dubious law enforcement practices

are under the spotlight like never before, some of that light undoubtedly shines

on Adams’ prior advocacy for stop and frisk. For a Black man to have embraced

that racially charged policing tactic is truly mind-blowing.


And he shows not one

iota of remorse when challenged about this. The best that he can come up with

is that his critics should simply “shut up.” That’s it. How childish and how very

demeaning. He also has a tendency to narcissistically refer to himself in the